1 Continued on next page... Welding Conditions This section covers more specifically the actual welding of low-carbon mild steels, stainless steels, aluminum alloys and copper alloys. It is the purpose of this section to establish recommended general welding procedures and conditions for each material. The tables of welding conditions should serve only as a starting point when beginning new applications. They do not represent the only good way in which a certain weld can be made. Changes in the welding conditions will most likely be caused by differences in the welder’s experience, the exact nature of the weld configuration (joint design) and the equipment in use. To obtain the optimum welding conditions that best satisfy the particular requirements of a new application, it is always advisable to conduct qualifying tests prior to production. However, this is the basic point – set a good, stable welding condition and it can most probably be used for many applications. When changes to the welding conditions are required, they must be carefully made. As seen in the previous section, each welding parameter has specific effects on the weld bead characteristics and many do overlap. All adjustments must be made one at a time and recorded for future reference. The discussion accompanying these tables will emphasize pertinent topics and establish general ”rules of thumb”. These rules should be adhered to regardless of the welding procedure finally chosen. Each table lists all the conditions necessary to make a weld, based on the material thickness, joint design, and position of welding. When referring to these tables, there are several important points: 1. The voltage listed is the arc voltage, not voltage read from a power source meter. The arc voltage is read between the last point of electrical contact in the torch (usually the guide tube) and the workpiece. It is not the voltage shown on the power source meter, which is generally 1.5 to 2.5 volts higher depending on the size and length of power cable. 2. The weld size equals the material thickness in the case of fillet welds. 3. The joint designs depicted are not the only designs that could be used for a given material thickness.
Introduction
Quality
Joint Design
Assurance
Low Carbon
Mild Steel
Stainless
Steel
Aluminum
Copper

 

 

 

Variations-
Metal
Transfer
Equipment
Power
Supply
Shielding
Gases
Wire
Electrodes
Safety
Welding
Techniques
Welding
Conditions
Economics
Weld
Defects
Mig Spot
Welding
Tables