1 Continued on next page... Mig Spot Welding Mig spot welding, although sometimes considered a tacking tool, has gained wide acceptance as a method of joining which is competitive with riveting and resistance spot welding. In some applications, it has replaced continuous welding methods as it provides reduced welding costs, reproducibility, and adequate strength for the service requirements and requires minimum operator skill. Mild steel, stainless steel and aluminum are very commonly welded with this method. PROCESS DESCRIPTION Mig spot welding, a variation of the continuous mig welding process, fuses two pieces of sheet material by penetrating entirely through one of the pieces into the other. There is no joint preparation required, other than cleaning, only that the two pieces overlap. However, pieces over 1/4 in. (6.4mm) generally require a hole in the top plate and are known as plug welds. Figure 11-1 shows a typical example of a mig spot weld. Figure 11-1 - Typical Spot Weld - Mild Steel
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