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Important
Info
Cast Iron
Alloys
Tool Steel
Electrodes
Nickel
Alloys
Nickel
Silver
Alloys
Copper
Alloys
Aluminum
Alloys
Silver
Alloys
Steel
Alloys
Metal
Removal
Electrodes
Hardfacing
Alloys
Misc.
Alloys
Packaged
Products
All-State
Fluxes
Safety
Appendices
Tool steel welding encompasses a variety of distinct applications: •  Repairs and alterations of dies and tools. •  Joining of dissimilar steels. •  Resurfacing existing dies and tools. •   Producing composite tools or dies by using mild, medium carbon or low alloyed steels as a base and welding on tool steel to form the cutting edges or working areas. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE WELDING OF TOOL STEELS 1.   If possible, identify tool steel type and its alloying composition. 2.  Find out hardness and tempered condition of tool. 3.   Fundamental to all tool and die welding is sound weld preparation.     a.   Welding must be done in an area that is free of drafts.     b.   Base metal must be clean and all sharp corners and edges removed.     c.   Avoid vee grooves and sharp corners where tension cracks can originate.     d.  Grind out all cracks completely. 4.   Select the proper All-State Tool Steel Electrode. When applying the first passes, we recommend the use of a striker plate to establish the arc, before pulling it over to the base metal. Generally, build-up is not necessary but if needed one or two layers of All-State® 275 are recommended. 5.   Slowly and uniformly preheat tools to correct temperature observing the following temperature ranges for flux coated electrodes; reduce temperature up to 200°F for TIG rods. Water hardening                                210°-480°F   (99°-249°C) Oil hardening                                      210°-570°F   (99°-299°C) Air hardening (A2-A6)                        300°-480°F (149°-249°C) Air hardening (D2-D5)                       750°-930°F (399°-499°C)    High C, high Cr types                        750°-930°F (399°-499°C) Hot work                                               390°-750°F (199°-399°C) High speed                                          750°-930°F (399°-499°C)