Electric Shock
Arc Rays &
Filters to Use
Spatter
Fumes and
Gases

 

 

 

Variations-
Metal
Transfer
Equipment
Power
Supply
Shielding
Gases
Wire
Electrodes
Safety
Welding
Techniques
Welding
Conditions
Economics
Weld
Defects
Mig Spot
Welding
Tables

 

2 ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill you. Do not touch live electrical parts. Electric shock can be avoided. Follow the recommended practices listed below. Faulty installation, improper grounding, and incorrect operation and maintenance of electrical equipment are always sources of danger. 1. Ground all electrical equipment and the workpiece. Prevent accidental electrical shocks. Connect power source, control cabinets, and workpiece to an approved electrical ground. The work lead is not a ground lead. It is used to complete the welding circuit. A separate connection is required to ground the work (illustrated on p. 5); or the work lead terminal on the power source may be connected to ground. Do not mistake the work lead for a ground connection. 2. Use the correct cable size. Sustained overloading will cause cable failure and result in possible electrical shock or fire hazard. Work cable should be the same rating as the torch cable. 3. Make sure all electrical connections are tight, clean, and dry. Poor electrical connections can heat up, and even melt. They can also cause bad welds and produce dangerous arcs and sparks. Do not allow water, grease, or dirt to accumulate on plugs, sockets, or electrical units. 4. Keep dry. Moisture and water can conduct electricity. To prevent shock, it is advisable to keep work areas, equipment, and clothing dry at all times. Fix water leaks immediately. Make sure that you are well insulated. Wear dry gloves, rubber-soled shoes, or stand on a dry board or platform. 5. Keep cables and connectors in good condition. Improper or worn electrical connections can cause short circuits and can increase the chance of an electrical shock. Do not use worn, damaged, or bare cables. 6. Avoid open-circuit voltage. Open-circuit voltage can cause electric shock. When several welders are working with arcs of different polarities, or when using multiple alternating-current machines, the open-circuit voltages can be additive. The added voltages increase the severity of the shock hazard. Continued on next page...